Here is an interesting discussion question from LIS 6210 posted by Dr. Neavill:

“…Around 1970 an eccentric English peer, Lord Longford, undertook a one-man investigation into pornography in London. He was a moderately well-known public figure and came from a literary family. His wife, Elizabeth Longford, and their daughter, Antonia Fraser, are well-known writers; at one time Antonia Fraser was married the playwright Harold Pinter. Lord Longford’s attitude toward pornography was out of synch with the prevailing ethos of “ swinging London,” and the sensational British press had a field day covering his investigation. Journalists dubbed him “Lord Porn” and followed him around on his visits to Soho strip clubs. He’d emerge from one club, declare how awful it was, and dart into another. In due course he wrote and published a 520 page report. Many people looking for the report remember him as “Lord Porn” but may not know his real name. Should “Lord Porn” be assigned as an access point to the report? Some points to consider: “Lord Porn” was a name bestowed by the press and wasn’t used by Lord Longford himself. It doesn’t appear on the title page. In general, should a library catalog establish such nicknames in the catalog, either as access points or cross references?

My stance:
Growing up in the suburbs of Oakland County, I recall hearing news casts about Doctor Jack Kevorkian, who was frequently referred to as “Dr. Death.” Completing a general Google search using the term “Dr. Death”, yielded a Wikipedia entry listing people commonly referred to as “Dr. Death” — among the names listed: Jack Kevorkian. Years later, it is not surprising to find his proper name escaping the memory of those discussing the topic of assisted suicide.

The spirit of the library catalog is to facilitate the access of information. While I personally do not feel that bestowed nicknames should be included, it follows the spirit of the catalog; therefore, my answer is grudgingly affirmative in nature. As a fellow student noted, a cross reference should be utilized, much like catalogs have done with Samuel L. Clemens and Mark Twain.

Lord Porn Evidence:

What is your stance?